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Home Remedies for Scalp Psoriasis

Posted by on Wednesday, September 29, 2010, 2:11
This news item was posted in H, Hair, S, Skin category and has 1 Comment so far.

Home Remedies for Scalp Psoriasis

Length of Treatment
It is not uncommon for scalp treatments to take eight or more weeks to get scalp psoriasis under control. After it’s under control, using a medicated shampoo on a regular basis may keep the problem from returning.

Home Remedies for Scalp Psoriasis
Home Remedies for Scalp Psoriasis

For people with mild to moderate scalp psoriasis, over-the-counter products or home remedies might work for you.

Salicylic acid, which can be found in a variety of soaps and shampoos, is frequently used to soften scales, thus making them easier to remove. But be prepared for some possible damage or hair loss; salicylic acid can weaken hair shafts, making them susceptible to breakage. However, any hair loss should be temporary.

You can also use heated olive oil to soften scales. After application to the scalp, treatment consists of wrapping the head in a towel for several hours or sitting under a hair dryer. Other over-the-counter scale-softening topical medications include ingredients such as urea, lactic acid and phenol.

Tar products both coal and, less frequently, wood are effective scalp psoriasis treatments. Tar products come in a variety of forms, but are often seen in shampoos. The drawbacks of tar products are the strong odor and staining. Tar can stain and discolor bedding, linens, clothing and white or gray hair. Tar products are massaged into the scalp and left on for a certain period of time before being rinsed off. If a tar product is used in shampoo form, try following it with a non-medicated conditioner to help eliminate the tar smell [source: National Psoriasis Foundation].

Phototherapy either at-home or done by a medical professional (such as with an excimer laser) can also be used to effectively treat scalp psoriasis. Phototherapy can be as simple as using natural sunlight. It’s also possible to use a hand-held UV comb to get light treatment to the scalp. The National Psoriasis Foundation’s Web site has a database that allows visitors to search for treatments that are most effective for the scalp or other body parts [source: National Psoriasis Foundation].

No matter what you choose prescription, over-the-counter or home remedy, it’s important to note that the National Psoriasis Foundation cautions that if the treatment for scalp psoriasis seems worse than the actual disease itself, it’s too harsh and changes should be made to your treatment plan [source: National Psoriasis Foundation].

For additional information or support regarding scalp psoriasis

Don’t toss out all those dark suits just yet. There’s a better way to deal with dandruff. As a matter of fact, you may be able simply to wash it away with our home remedies.

You may not realize it, but you are constantly shedding dead skin cells from all over your body. It’s the skin’s natural way to rejuvenate itself. In fact, you get a whole new suit of skin about every 27 or 28 days. The old stuff just sort of flakes away. You just don’t tend to notice the tiny skin cells dropping off your arms, your legs, and even your scalp.

Dandruff results from the same shedding of skin cells. But if the shedding process is normal, what happens to make dandruff so embarrassingly noticeable?

Home Remedies for Scalp Psoriasis
Home Remedies for Scalp Psoriasis

Scientists have discovered that dandruff occurs when a yeast-like fungus called malassezia goes wild on your scalp. The microscopic malassezia fungus, a normal inhabitant on a healthy human head, feeds on the fatty oils secreted by hair follicles in the scalp. But sometimes, for reasons that are as yet unclear, the fungus grows out of control, causing irritation that actually speeds up cell turnover on the scalp. As a result, the normal process of cell turnover, which usually takes a month, may take less than two weeks when out-of-control malassezia has irritated the scalp. So many dead cells are shed at the same time that, when they mix with the oil from the hair follicles, they tend to form greasy clumps big enough to be clearly visible to the naked eye. The oil also makes the clumps more likely to get stuck in your hair (and on your shoulders), rather than floating quickly away.

1: Shampoo each day to keep it away
Hair care

What easier way to get rid of dandruff than to wash it down the drain? Getting rid of excess oils (which may contribute to the overgrowth of malassezia in the first place) and flakes through daily shampooing may be the easiest way to tame your mane.

2: Switch Shampoos

Switch Shampoos
Switch Shampoos

If your regular shampoo isn’t doing the trick, even with daily washing, it’s time to switch to an antidandruff shampoo. Check the ingredients in over-the-counter dandruff shampoos, and look for one that contains zinc pyrithione, which can reduce the fungus; selenium sulfide, which can limit cell turnover and possibly even decrease the amount of fungus; salicylic acid, which works as a sort of scrub to slough off dead skin; or ketoconazole, which works against a broad array of fungi.

3: Go for three

Your favorite dandruff shampoo may stop working after a while, and those little flakes may return. Don’t blame the shampoo. You simply may have built up a resistance to its active ingredient. To prevent this, try rotating three brands of dandruff shampoo (each with a different formulation), using each for a month. In other words, use one shampoo for a month, then switch to a second brand for a month, then to a third brand for a month, then back to the original shampoo for a month, and so on.

4: Lather twice

The first lathering and rinsing gets rid of the loose flakes and the oily buildup on your hair and scalp. It sort of clears the area so the second lathering can get to work. Leave the second lathering of shampoo on your hair at least five minutes before rinsing it off. That gives the shampoo a chance to penetrate the skin cells and do what it’s supposed to do.

5. Try tar

If the antidandruff shampoos aren’t working, it’s time to bring out the big guns, namely the tar shampoos, which have been a proven remedy for more than 200 years. The tar decreases cell turnover quite effectively, though there are some drawbacks. Tar shampoos have a strong odor, may stain the shaft of lighter-colored hair (it can take weeks of using a milder shampoo to get rid of the discoloration), and may irritate the skin.

6: Use a rinse

If you decide to go with a tar shampoo, rinse your hair with lemon juice, a conditioner, or creme rinse to get rid of any lingering odor from the shampoo. Using a hair conditioner after washing with any antidandruff shampoo is a good idea anyway, because the medicated shampoos tend to stiffen hair and make it less manageable. Many of them also dry the scalp, which can add to flaking; a conditioner can help seal in nourishing moisture.

7: Be sensitive to your sensitivity

There are some people who just shouldn’t use a tar shampoo. Why? Because they’re so sensitive. Rather, their scalp is, and a tar shampoo can irritate and inflame their hair follicles, causing a condition called folliculitis. The cure? Switch to a milder shampoo.

8: Stop those itchy fingers

Try to resist the temptation to go after those itchy patches like a dog chasing fleas. You may end up with wounds to your scalp caused by your fingernails. If you break the skin on your scalp, discontinue use of medicated shampoo for a while. Switch to a mild shampoo, such as a baby shampoo, and use it daily until the scratches are healed.

9: Shower away sweat

Shower away sweat
Shower away sweat

After exercise or strenuous work that makes you perspire, shower and shampoo as soon as possible. Sweat irritates the scalp and speeds up the flaking of skin cells.

10: Go easy on the sticky stuff

Although you needn’t give up the various mousses, sprays, and gels that hold your hairstyle in place, try to use them less often. These hair products can contribute to oily buildup.

Dandruff can be an embarrassing problem, but you can shake those pesky flakes for good by following our home remedies.

For more information, see How to Treat Dandruff or test your knowledge with the Dandruff Quiz.  To see all of our home remedies and the conditions they treat, go to our main Home Remedies page.

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1 Response to “Home Remedies for Scalp Psoriasis”

  1. [...] 2 percent of the global population have this skin disorder. And the occurrence rate of scalp psoriasis is very high; of all the psoriasis patients, about 50 percent people have this scalp type. Scalp [...]

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