Tuesday, November 12, 2019 4:05

Cradle Cap

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Posted by on Wednesday, February 2, 2011, 23:17
This news item was posted in C, Children category and has 0 Comments so far.

You might expect your baby’s skin to be flawless, but baby rashes such as cradle cap are common.Cradle cap appears as thick, yellow, crusty or greasy patches on a baby’s scalp. Cradle cap is most common in newborns and usually clears up on its own within a few months.

Cradle Cap
Cradle Cap

In the meantime, wash your baby’s hair once a day with mild baby shampoo. Loosen the scales with a small, soft-bristled brush before rinsing off the shampoo. For stubborn scales, rub petrolatum or a few drops of mineral oil onto your baby’s scalp, wait a few minutes and then brush and shampoo your baby’s hair. If cradle cap persists, consult your baby’s doctor.
A patchwork of bright red skin on your baby’s bottom is probably diaper rash, typically caused by prolonged contact with urine or feces. To treat diaper rash, air out your baby’s bottom. Apply a thick layer of zinc oxide or petroleum jelly, which doesn’t have to be completely removed at the next diaper change. Consult your baby’s doctor if the rash doesn’t improve within a few days, begins to blister or spreads beyond the diaper area.

To prevent diaper rash, change your baby’s diaper frequently, let your baby go without a diaper for short periods of time, and regularly apply a barrier ointment during diaper changes.
Many babies are born with milia — tiny white bumps that appear on the nose, chin or cheeks. The condition occurs when skin flakes become trapped near the surface of the baby’s skin. Most cases of milia disappear on their own within a few weeks. In the meantime, wash your baby’s face once a day with water and a mild soap. Don’t use lotions or oils and never pinch or scrub the bumps.
Baby acne appears as red or white bumps on a baby’s forehead or cheeks. The condition often develops within the first month after birth, thanks to exposure to maternal hormones during pregnancy. Baby acne usually disappears on its own without scarring. In the meantime, wash your baby’s face once a day with water and a mild soap. Don’t use lotions or oils and never pinch or scrub the bumps. Consult your baby’s doctor if the acne doesn’t improve within three months.
Heat rash appears as fine, clear or red spots on your baby’s skin. Heat rash is common in babies during hot, humid weather — often a result of overdressing. Heat rash generally disappears on its own, although it helps to move the baby to a cooler environment. To prevent heat rash in hot weather, dress your baby in cool, lightweight clothing. In cold weather, dress your baby in layers so that you can remove items if the temperature rises.
Baby eczema is characterized by patches of red, scaly, itchy skin. Occasionally the patches ooze and crust over. Baby eczema occurs when a baby is exposed to potentially irritating substances, such as bubble baths or rough fabrics.

Many babies outgrow eczema. To treat and prevent baby eczema, help your baby avoid extreme temperatures and irritants that bother his or her skin. Bathe your baby every second or third day, dry your baby’s skin with gentle pats, and use generous amounts of unscented moisturizing cream or ointment. Consult your baby’s doctor if the rash is severe or doesn’t improve.
A yeast infection is a persistent, bright red rash on a baby’s bottom or other areas where skin touches skin. You might notice small red bumps on the outer edge of the rash. A yeast infection can also develop in a baby’s mouth. This type of infection, known as thrush, appears as creamy white sores in the mouth. Yeast infections are caused by a microorganism that flourishes in a warm, moist environment and is more common in babies who’ve recently taken antibiotics. If you suspect that your baby has a yeast infection, consult your baby’s doctor. A yeast infection is treated with a prescription antifungal cream.

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